Monday, April 25, 2016

Update: Five More Train Songs #atozchallenge

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First, a technical note: Those of you who read the simulcast of this blog on Blogger might have noticed that, for the last week or so, the videos weren’t coming through. They must have changed something and the code I had been using to embed them was being eliminated, either by IFTTT or by Blogger when it got there. I’ve used a different technique which seems to work all right (it was how I embedded yesterday’s videos, which came through), and I hope these work as well. If not, I might have to reconsider whether simulcasting via IFTTT is worth the trouble.

Anyway, I shared five train videos on Saturday and asked which were your favorites. God knows there are enough train songs out there. So today, I give you an update with five more songs about trains, suggested by you, the readers.

Morning Train (9 to 5) – Sheena Easton: Stephie came up with this; she said “I know, that’s a lame choice,” but actually, I like this one. This was Sheena’s biggest hit, reaching #1 in the US, Canada, and Australia and #3 in the UK.

Midnight Train To Georgia – Gladys Knight & The Pips: The song practically everyone mentioned; Uncle Jack said he was surprised it wasn’t the first song I thought of. It was #1 on the pop chart for two weeks and on the Soul chart for four in October 1973.

Atcheson, Topeka and the Santa Fe – Judy Garland: from 1946’s The Harvey Girls starring Judy Garland, Ray Bolger (I think they were in another movie together), and John Hodiak.

Chattanooga Choo-Choo – Glenn Miller and His Orchestra: From the 1941 movie Sun Valley Serenade starring Sonja Henie and John Payne. All kinds of goodness here: Glenn and his orchestra, with Tex Beneke on saxophone and vocal; the beautiful Dorothy Dandridge and the Nicholas Brothers; and Milton Berle for good measure.

Last Train To Clarksville – The Monkees: This was the Monkeees’ 1966 debut single, written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. It reached #1 in the US and Canada and #23 in the UK. While Clarksville, Tennessee (a very nice town; Mary and I used to stop there on our way back from Chicago) is close to Fort Campbell, Kentucky, Boyce and Hart weren’t thinking about it when they wrote the song; they just wanted a town name that fit the music.

Did your favorite make the list?

Monday’s Music Moves Me will return next week!




from The Sound of One Hand Typing

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