Tuesday, April 19, 2016

Two (3) for Tuesday: The Alan Parsons Project #atozchallenge

P
ProgRock

Kind of like Steely Dan, which is Donald Fagen and Walter Becker accompanied by session musicians, The Alan Parsons Project was Alan Parsons (keyboards, acoustic guitar, vocals, and a host of other instruments) and Eric Woolfson (keyboards, vocals, and composition) accompanied by session players, which usually included Ian Bairnson (guitar), David Paton (bass and vocals), and Lenny Zakatek (drums). They were active from 1975 through 1990. Parsons had been assistant engineer for The Beatles’ Abbey Road and Let It Be albums and had just engineered The Dark Side of The Moon for Pink Floyd when he met Woolfson, a session pianist, at Abbey Road Studios in 1974. They produced ten studio albums (an eleventh, The Sicilian Defence, wasn’t released until 2014, as part of a box set).

I was surprised that I recognized so much of their music. I think I mentioned before that radio stations weren’t always good at mentioning the song and artist during the Seventies and Eighties, especially when the song was tucked into a long set. Did you find that to be true?

Games People Play – From the band’s 1980 album The Turn of a Friendly Card, this reached #9 on the Canadian chart and #16 on the US chart that year.

Sirius/Eye in the Sky – The title track from their 1982 album, this reached #1 in Canada and #3 in the US that year.

Old and Wise – Also from Eye In The Sky, this reached #21 on the US Adult Contemporary chart.

Time – Again from The Turn of a Friendly Card, this reached #30 in Canada and #15 in the US in 1981.

I Wouldn’t Want To Be Like You – From their 1977 album I Robot, this rose to #22 in Canada and #36 in the US that year. Look, an old Univac computer!

The Project has a website and a Facebook page, and Woolfson has his own website to showcase his POE: More Tales of Mystery and Magic album.

The Alan Parsons Project, your Two (plus three) For Tuesday (and “P” entry of the A to Z Challenge), April 19, 2016.




from The Sound of One Hand Typing

1 comment:

  1. More pop than rock, but they were progressive. There were a lot of pop-rock bands in the 70's that were actually progressive, such as Kansas and Toto. (And of course, progressive masters Rush.)

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