Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Edvard Grieg (#atozchallenge)

315px-Edvard_Grieg_(1888)_by_Elliot_and_Fry_-_02

Edvard Grieg (1888) by Elliot and Fry – 02” by Elliott & Fry – Immediate image source: Bergen Off. Bibliotek: Griegsamlingen, image #0241950 (Warning: the site has misidentified the photograph; see the cabinet card version page for details of actual origin.). Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Edvard Hagerup Grieg (6/15/1843 – 9/4/1907) was a Norwegian pianist and composer, considered one of the leading composers of the Romantic period. His work drew on Norwegian folk music and introduced it to the world, forging a national identity at a time when Norway was still under Danish control and really had none. He was both born and buried in the town of Bergen, but traveled extensively all over Europe, and felt that his music expressed both the Norwegian rural life as well as the culture of Europe as a whole.


Maybe his best-known work was the incidental music for Henrik Ibsen’s play Peer Gynt. Below are Suites No. 1 and No. 2, performed by Orquesta Sinfónica de RTVE under the direction of Guillermo Garcia Calvo.









from The Sound of One Hand Typing

8 comments:

  1. Beautiful! Thanks for sharing this piece!

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  2. Good to know. The music is beautiful. I recognized the piece immediately.

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    1. It's probably his best-known work, and it's one of those all-time favorite classical themes, particularly "In the Hall of the Mountain King."

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  3. I have not hear of Grieg, but Ibsen I have heard of - I saw the play 'A Doll's House', long ago and was taken with the message. Thanks for teaching me something new. I love live music, and a symphony has such power. Glad you liked the Grappelli post and thanks for that link. Loved listening to that too.

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    1. Grappelli, Django, and the rest of the group were well ahead of their time musically. Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang, a violin-and-guitar combo, are also worth listening to; they might have inspired the Quintette. I particularly like that video as a guitarist, because Django's playing was a mystery; it was well-known that he had burned his hand badly and that the ring and pinky fingers on his left hand were crippled, and that he rarely used them when he was playing, but he did so many amazing things on the guitar that it left you wondering "how did he DO that?"

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  4. Beautiful post about a maker of beautiful music. Thanks so much for sharing the video--you've given me something lovely to listen to during my lunch break.

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    1. It's a good, long selection. Bookmark it so you can come back to it.

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